Fotografia di: Visit Bruges - Jan Darthet
Torre Civica

Torre Civica

La torre più importante di Bruges risale al XIII secolo, è alta 83 metri ed è protetta come patrimonio dell’umanità. Chi sale i suoi 366 gradini viene premiato con un panorama mozzafiato su Bruges e dintorni. Lungo la salita, è possibile sostare nella camera del tesoro, dove nel Medioevo venivano conservati l’emblema, il sigillo e la cassa cittadina. Proseguendo, si incontra l’impressionante rullo che aziona il carillon e la tastiera su cui il mastro campanaro suona le 47 campane. Bruges’ Belfry has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1999.
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Bruges’ historic city centre

Bruges’ historic city centre

The entire historic centre of Bruges is a designated World Heritage site. This is especially unusual and there are a number of reasons behind it. Both the structure and the architecture of the city point to Bruges’ prominent past as one of Europe’s most significant trade centres, from the unique pattern of the streets to the well-preserved second defensive city ramparts, the canal network (‘reien’) and the city’s material heritage. Bruges’ medieval heritage has also been expertly preserved and renovated. The remarkable visual unity of the city was also well-preserved thanks to the carefully-considered neo-gothic style. But it is not only the many medieval buildings and monuments that have stood the test of time; the city’s intangible heritage, such as the many traditional processions, is still part of life in Bruges today. Bruges is also considered to be the birthplace of the Flemish primitives, a group of painters who elevated Bruges’ status to that of an internationally renowned centre for art in the 15th century. You can still marvel at many works of art by the world-renowned masters in Bruges, the city where they were created. And despite the fact that many centuries have gone by, Bruges’ skyline remains unchanged. Modern Bruges is an architecturally coherent whole, with a clearly defined historic centre that is without false notes or visual noise. A beautiful sight that has stood proud for many centuries.
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I primitivi fiamminghi

I primitivi fiamminghi

Durante il Secolo d’Oro, dal 1400, le belle arti padroneggiavano a Bruges. Nomi famosi quali Jan van Eyck e Hans Memling si stabilirono in città. Oggigiorno è possibile ammirare le creazioni dei noti primitivi fiamminghi nel Museo Groeninge e nell’Ospedale di San Giovanni. Ma anche nella camera del tesoro della più antica parrocchia di Bruges, la Cattedrale di San Salvatore, hai la possibilità di apprezzare vis à vis dipinti realizzati in città secoli e secoli fa.
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Procession of the Holy Blood

Procession of the Holy Blood

Every year on Ascension Day, the Procession of the Holy Blood passes through the historic city center of Bruges. The Procession of the Holy Blood was created in 1304 as an expression of gratitude and faith. More than 1700 participants sing, play music, dance and act. The style of the procession reminds of the Burgundian time when guildsmen, craftsmen, brotherhoods and rhetoric chambers were responsible for the performance of the scenes. The dominating theme is the remembrance of the suffering of Jesus Christ. The biblical narrations constitute the basis of the procession. Thematically, the Procession of the Holy Blood is divided into four parts. The evocation starts with the Old Testament, from Creation to the prophets. Next comes the New Testament, from Birth in Bethlehem to Pentecost. The third part tells how the relic of the Holy Blood ended up in Bruges. In the last part, the members of the Noble Brotherhood of the Holy Blood accompany the shrine in which the precious relic is stored.
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Bruges and the carillon, a shared history

Bruges and the carillon, a shared history

A carillon is a musical instrument that is played using a keyboard and that consists of at least 23 bronze bells. The bells must provide a harmonic sound. The carillon first saw the limelight in the 16th century when rich cities, like Bruges, embellished their belfries and steeples with tower bells. In the 17th century, the technique was refined and by the end of the 19th century, the carillon was increasingly used as a musical instrument in its own right, not related, therefore, to towers and churches. Since November 2014, UNESCO has recognised the Belgian carillon culture as Intangible Cultural Heritage. Those of you who wish to listen to a spot of carillon playing in the next few days can do so at the Market Square of Bruges (carillon with 47 bells), the Grootseminarie (theological academy) of Bruges (26 bells), Damme Town Hall (39 bells) and the Church of Lissewege (24 bells).
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Belgian Beer Culture

Belgian Beer Culture

Nobody in Belgium was particularly surprised when UNESCO designated Belgian beer culture as Intangible Cultural Heritage. When you drink a beer here, you are tasting history. And it tastes pretty good, too! There are many breweries in Bruges and the surrounding area, ranging from the large-scale crowd-pullers to the smaller micro-breweries. Many restaurants also like to cook with local beers, creating classic recipes as well as some more contemporary dishes. Bruges even has its very own city beer – Brugse Zot. This beer became an instant classic for the people of Bruges. Add to this the many cafes with their extensive beer menus and the renowned winter beer festival and you’ve got a city simply bursting with Belgian beer culture, not to mention its great history of beer going back many centuries.
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Visualizza UNESCO città patrimonio mondiale dell’umanità sulla mappa