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Medina

Medina

You will be surprised by the straight layout of the city's historical heart in sharp contrast to the usual maze of streets. A walk through Rabat's medina could look like this: start your visit at the Bab El Had gate and take Souika Street, the largest and probably busiest street in the medina. You will arrive in the Es Sabat souk, the shoe market, covered with reed mats and overflowing with babouches (leather slippers) as well as silver and gold jewellery. You then come to the partially glass-roofed Rue des Consuls where craftsmen make woollen carpets, fabrics and copperware. The medina also offers low-priced and local food, so do not hesitate to try mint tea, pastillas or tagine.
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Kasbah of the Udayas

Kasbah of the Udayas

Oudayas Kasbah near Rabat's nedina has kept its old cannons placed on a bastion. Its massive gate is entirely carved, while its blue and white walls give it a Mediterranean atmosphere. Cobbled streets lead to the El Atiqa Mosque, the oldest in the city, and on to the old semaphore platform. The view from here, or the terrace of the neighbouring Café Maure, is splendid: Rabat, nearby Salé and Bouregreg river meeting the ocean. The Oudayas Palace, further on up, which now houses the National Museum, has conserved its markedly simple and balanced original decor. The Andalusian Gardens below are a heaven of peace full of fruit trees, rose-laurels and cascades of bougainvilleas.
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Hassan Tower

Hassan Tower

Once intended to be part of the largest mosque in the world, Hassan Tower overlooks Bouregreg river and offers a fantastic view. Equally spectacular is the square in front of the tower, with multiple columns. Every day at 10:45am, you can enter the court of the barracks of the royal guard to attend the ceremony of the hoisting of the colours (the national flag). Also worth a visit is the changing of the mounted guard, which takes place every day at 7:00am in front of Hassan Tower.
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