• Historical destinations

    United States

    Historical destinations

Baltimore, Maryland

Baltimore, Maryland

Baltimore is situated along the shores of the vast Chesapeake Bay nearly 200 miles inland from the Atlantic Ocean. Since the 1600s, Baltimore waterways have given passage to ships carrying commercial cargo and new citizens - making it the second most popular point of entry for immigrants next to Ellis Island. It is located approximately 35 miles northeast of Washington DC and 75 miles southwest of Philadelphia, PA.
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Big Island, Hawaii

Big Island, Hawaii

The Island of Hawaii is known colloquially as “Big Island.” This is a fitting nickname, for the Island is twice the combined size of its neighboring counterparts! Big Island flaunts its colors like the plumes of a peacock: fierce reds of magma from Hawaii Volcanoes National Park contrast spectacularly with the bright white snow of Maunakea, while the electric black sands of Punaluu Beach stream into the emerald green of Hamakua Coast’s rainforests. Let Big Island’s significance as the birthplace of King Kamehameha I serve as a prelude to all of its wonders.
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Blaine, Washington

Blaine, Washington

Blaine, Washington is perfectly placed for the ultimate escape. Positioned 35 miles south of Vancouver, British Columbia and 110 miles north of bustling Seattle, Blaine certainly carves out its own stake in bliss. In addition to a reputation for being an incredibly clean, safe town, Blaine glistens in natural beauty. Over a dozen parks are fit for bird watching, biking, and trailblazing, while a handful of manicured golf courses also add to an itinerary of outdoor recreation.
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Cave Creek, Arizona

Cave Creek, Arizona

Cave Creek, Arizona is an archeologist’s dream. Myriads of Hopi Indian tribal artifacts line the mountainsides and stone formations, and the flora is entirely unique to the region. Naturally, Cave Creek shares the abundant sunshine and divine landscape of greater Arizona, which consequently draws countless visitors each year to its location. The lifestyle of this city is entirely Western, with rural development, open trails, spaces and wildlife habitats, and overwhelmingly fantastic views.
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Charleston, South Carolina

Charleston, South Carolina

With its celebrated restaurant scene, architectural treasures, historic wonders and serene coastal landscapes, it’s no surprise that lovely Charleston is a popular vacation destination. Explore the area’s culture through local food and music festivals, dine on Lowcountry cuisine and browse for Sea Island crafts. Wander through Charleston’s historic district and peer past wrought-iron gates into mysterious courtyards and fragrant gardens. Take one of many tours exploring the city’s culinary hot spots, antebellum mansions, historic churches, breweries and more. Stay at a charming inn, a historic hotel or a beach resort. Discover the people, flavours, traditions, sights and sounds found only in Charleston. Learn more at: www.visittheusa.com/destination/charleston
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Concord, North Carolina

Concord, North Carolina

Following in the steps of its fellow northeastern cities within the early Colonies, the city of Concord was established around the spirit of unity, harmony, and friendship. As the name “Concord” actually means “with harmony,” these characteristics are seen all over the city. Residential, business, industrial, and historical elements are all blended together to make Concord an impressive cocktail of evolution and tradition.
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Key West, Florida

Key West, Florida

The spectacular city of Key West, is part of the Monroe County, FL, United States, and also the southernmost city in the Continental US. It is located 129 miles and approximately two hours away form the cosmopolitan city of Miami. With its impeccable weather, Key West enjoys the distinction of being a major seaport destination for many passenger cruise ships. This spectacular city will offer you scenic beaches, an abundance of exciting venues to explore, multi-ethnic restaurants, and luxurious hotels with breathtaking views.
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Lincoln, New Hampshire

Lincoln, New Hampshire

Mountainous views, fresh, flowing streams and a kingdom of forests and wildlife. Lincoln (New Hampshire) was established as one of America's first colonies in 1782, and the town has been attracting the adventurous ever since. There truly is no limit to the exploration: there you can go hiking, camping, picnicking, skiing, snowboarding, birding, sightseeing and much more. Guests to the Lincoln area can also expect a glimpse of standard New England luxury, with fine dining, upscale shopping districts and spa retreats.
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Lynden, Washington

Lynden, Washington

Step into Lynden, Washington and consider yourself stepping into a Little Netherlands! Dutch heritage is present in the town’s dairy farms, blueberry and strawberry fields, parks, museums, and its architecture. What makes Lynden such an attractive destination is also the alluring proximity to other points of interest, including Canada five miles north, county seat Bellingham 15 miles away, and half-an-hour’s drive from the Pacific Ocean. Skiers may be happy to know that the popular Mount Baker is only an hour away as well.
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Mason, Ohio

Mason, Ohio

Mason is the largest city in Warren County and was was listed as number seven in Money Magazine's "Best Places to Live" list in 2013. Mason is a continuously growing community, with new businesses and attractions opening every year. When visiting Mason, you'll have no shortage of activities. Mason is home to many museums, businesses, attractions, shops, and much more. With the community growing so rapidly, there is always something new going on.
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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

As the birthplace of America, Philadelphia has endured centuries of peril, challenges and conquest, and remains one of the nation’s top attractions. Historical buildings, sculptures and murals line streets that were once walked by the Founding Fathers of the United States. Weather varies throughout the seasons, vacillating between mild springs, hot summers, and chilly winters, but people can always be seen out and about in the City of Brotherly Love.
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St Louis, Missouri

St Louis, Missouri

Sitting near the confluence of two great North American rivers — the Mississippi and the Missouri — the St. Louis region has been a favored destination since Lewis & Clark began their historic westward discovery here in 1804. Dubbed the “Gateway to the West,” St. Louis welcomes its visitors with the world’s tallest arch (630 ft.) which was completed in 1965 as a monument to Thomas Jefferson and the westward expansion of the United States.
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Traverse City, Michigan

Traverse City, Michigan

Traverse City’s claim to fame is its position as the largest producer of tart cherries in the United States. The Michigan city hosts annual events to celebrate the cherry harvests, which attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors. The land is also ripe for Traverse City’s numerous vineyards, which place it among the Midwest’s top centers of wine production. After touring the orchards and attending the wine tasting events, head to Traverse City’s freshwater beaches, the National Lakeshore, downhill skiing areas, and verdant forests.
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Williamsburg, Virginia

Williamsburg, Virginia

Historic pride and natural beauty - Williamsburg seems to have the best of both as millions of travelers visit the city every year for its timeless attractions and verdant landscapes. Colonial remnants of buildings, museums, hotels and taverns are favorites of locals and vacationers alike, with Revolutionary reenactments and interpretations spanning the hillsides and battlefields. Take to the waters with Old World schooners, sailing with the Virginian breezes that were once experienced by legendary figures like George Washington and John Smith.
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