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Fanad Head

Fanad Head

On the north coast of Donegal, golden sandy beaches and rolling farmland threaded by narrow roads set the scene in the secluded Fanad peninsula. Follow the Knockalla Coast Road and you’ll find yourself at Ballymastocker Bay. When you see it, you’ll understand why this was voted as one of the most beautiful beaches in the world. A visit to the iconic Fanad Lighthouse is also a must. Other than sightseeing, Fanad Head lends itself to outdoor activities like kayaking, golfing and fishing.
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Slieve League

Slieve League

A narrow road twists steeply up from Teelin to the dramatic Slieve League mountain and cliffs on the southwest coast of Donegal. The cliffs are some of the highest in Europe and are considerably higher than the more famous Cliffs of Moher. For the experienced walker, One Man’s pass will take you to Slieve League's summit. For the leisure visitor, there is a viewing platform from which you can see one of the finest views of the Atlantic Ocean, the Sligo Mountains and Donegal Bay.
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Skellig Islands

Skellig Islands

World-renowned for their ornithological, archaeological and cultural significance, the Skellig Islands lay out to sea and can be reached by visitors on a small boat from Portmagee, Ballinskelligs or Caherdaniel. Skellig Michael, or Great Skellig, is a mysterious and awe-inspiring place where tourists flock all year round. 1,300 years ago, early Christian monks built a hermitage here, which is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In the coastal village of Portmagee you'll also find the Skelligs Experience Visitor Centre, where you can follow an audio-visual tour recreating the magic of the Skellig region and enjoy its history. At the near St. Finian’s Bay, a great pleasure awaits: Europe’s most westerly chocolate factory, Skelligs Chocolate - where you can enjoy a warm hot chocolate as the waves crash on the beach outside.
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Mizen Head

Mizen Head

Mizen Head on the Mizen Peninsula is Ireland's mainland most southwesterly point. Breathtaking cliffs, beautiful views, lively sea life and educational experiences can all be found here. Head right away to the Visitor Centre, where you'll learn more about the history of this place, which is home to a signal station that housed Ireland's first radio beacon. Then, climb down the 99 steps that lead to a high arched suspension bridge connecting a rocky crag to the mainland, until you find yourself at the signal station, where another exciting exhibition awaits. Out on the horizon, you can spot the imposing Fastnet Lighthouse standing on a rock known as Ireland’s teardrop.
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Kinsale

Kinsale

Kinsale is a picturesque historic town south of Cork, and can be your last (or second) stop on your Wild Atlantic Way journey. Highlights of the town include the 17th century Charles Fort and James Fort, the 13th century St. Multose Church, and Desmond Castle, also known as the "French prison" and home to a wine museum. Try to visit them all, but also save some time for a leisurely stroll in town, among its colorful streets and Georgian houses, and eat a delicious meal in one of its many quaint restaurants. If you fancy exploring a little below the surface, you'll be happy to know that Kinsale is also a popular diving destination. If instead you prefer to stay above the waves, there are plenty of water activities for you as well, like sailing, kayaking and fishing.
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