Cork

Cork

Welcome to the “People’s Republic of Cork” - Ireland’s southernmost city. A spirited, independent place, with cosmopolitan and creative vibes. An ancient maritime port, Cork has spent centuries trading with – and being influenced by – the wider world. Whatever time of the year you visit, you are guaranteed fun and craic.
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Donegal & The North West

Donegal & The North West

Breathe in the ocean air as you embark on a journey along emerald scenery and rugged limestone cliffs. Donegal's windswept coastal landscape is a treasure trove for all those interested in history. The region is known for producing the finest of traditional tweed garments, as well as a few mythic tales. Wash it all down with a creamy Guinness and experience and sublime marine cuisine.
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Dublin

Dublin

Dublin is a cultural capital with a rich history. Natives abroad yearn for the pubs and the humour (or "craic") which teem in this ever-growing city. A fascinating place with incredible beautifully preserved mansions and castles, meticulously curated museums, churches, cathedrals, and parks, the city has one foot in the past and en eye on the future.
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Galway & The West

Galway & The West

Dramatic, haunting and utterly wild, Galway – in the West of Ireland – is a unique place. Rugged cliffs and craggy countryside are dotted with bursts of colour. Galway is famed for its beaches and soaring mountains, as well as its creative spirit, raucous nightlife, and tradition-rich Gaeltacht region.
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Irish Islands

Irish Islands

Otherworldly landscapes and a strong sense of tradition - it’s no wonder these islands have inspired so much folklore and lyric. Dotted with remnants of prehistoric, early Christian, Viking and medieval settlements, these islands are steeped in tradition, and are often Irish-speaking. Daring adventurers won't be bored - many of the islands offer unique diving or water sport experiences. A remote island escape is often accessible by bridge, tidal causeway, or a short ferry journey.
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Kerry

Kerry

The ancient Kingdom of Kerry lies on the very edge of Europe - once believed to be the edge of the world, “Next parish, Manhattan” is a local phrase. This far-flung place is tucked away from the hustle and bustle of city life. Lively towns with a strong traditional culture combine with some of the world's most beautiful coastline scenery in this unique place.
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Kilkenny

Kilkenny

Kilkenny – a beautiful and ancient country where history, modern living and rich culture fuse together across an unspoiled landscape. The ancient medieval city of Kilkenny has protected its precious heritage whilst evolving as one of Ireland’s most vibrant and enjoyable cities in which to stay. Its narrow slipways, side streets and preserved buildings, are matched only by its reputation for fine dining, great shopping, entertainment and accommodation.
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Limerick

Limerick

Limerick, sitting on the banks of the River Shannon, is Ireland’s first ever City of Culture. This is where Frank McCourt set his novel, "Angela’s Ashes". It’s a city peppered with galleries, protected by King John’s Castle, and rich in elegantly crumbling Georgian architecture. The city of rugby also has a thriving street art scene, a lively festival schedule, and a crossroads tailor-made for foodies in the Milk Market.
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River Shannon & Lakelands

River Shannon & Lakelands

The Lakelands are a very pretty watery link of 12 counties— Monaghan, Cavan, Leitrim, Longford, Roscommon, Westmeath, Offaly, Tipperary, Galway, Clare, Limerick and Kerry — that all get connected by the 380 or so kilometres of River Shannon. With its winding curves, which eventually meet Fermanagh’s Lough Erne in Northern Ireland, this performance is quite not bad for only just one river.
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Waterford & The East

Waterford & The East

Waterford, the oldest city in Ireland, is the perfect blend of ancient and modern. Gourmet restaurants and traditional pubs co-exist with medieval city walls, quaint cobbled streets, and historic buildings still standing proud after more than a thousand years. And as you leave the medieval strongholds behind, you'll find yourself amid a scenery that is well worth an extended Wild Atlantic road trip.
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Wild Atlantic Way, Ireland

Wild Atlantic Way, Ireland

The Wild Atlantic Way, along the untamed west coast of Ireland, is the world's longest coastal driving route. Explore its diverse and stunning landscape, exploring the wonders of its coves and islands, beaches and bays, cliffs and villages. If wilderness, water and a willingness to step off the traditional tourist trails is your thing, then the Wild Atlantic Way is the only way.
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