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Section in Dublin
Do & See
Dublin’s streets are a busy mix of past and present. This city has always inspired writers, visitors and political firebrands alike. To walk these streets is to journey through history, from the city’s Viking roots by the banks of the river Liffey, to its atmospheric medieval churches with their mummified remains and holy relics. More recent architecture includes the gracious Georgian streets, as well as museums, theatres and several parks where one can escape the hustle and bustle of city life.
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Boyne Valley

Boyne Valley

Discover Ireland's Ancient East in the Boyne Valley, just 20 minutes from Dublin Airport. Tours operate frequently and the wealth of heritage sites make it worth the trip. The most well-known landmark is the mythical and magical Brú na Bóinne (or "Newgrange"). Every year, crowds flock to Newgrange to celebrate the Winter Solstice and its significance in ancient Pagan culture. The valley's collection of ancient tombs, towers and runes are accompanied by numerous ancient myths and legends. As well as this, picturesque villages, majestic buildings and the famous Hill of Tara make for an exciting and diverse day out.
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Howth Head Peninsula

Howth Head Peninsula

On the north-side of Dublin Bay lies the mythic Howth peninsula. An exclusive neighbourhood, the island is home to a yachting harbour, artisan restaurants and a quality farmer's market. Howth's natural beauty make it a true gem for a wanderer looking to escape the city. The dramatic cliffs and hill walks welcome explorers - for an interesting hike, make sure to follow the "Bog of Frogs" loop!. Howth Summit Viewpoint and a stroll on Claremont Beach offer breathtaking views, while Howth Castle, St Mary's Abbey and "Ye Olde Hurdy Gurdy Radio Museum" provide a sense of the peninsula's heritage. As well as this, visitors can take the ferry to Ireland's Eye Bird Sanctuary in summer.
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Dalkey Island

Dalkey Island

Find tranquility in seclusion at this 9-hectare uninhabited island, only a 5-minute ferry journey from Coliemore Harbour. Holy stones are dotted around the island, and the runes of a 7th century church remind us that this has long been a place of pilgrimage and spirituality. The island is believed to have been inhabited since 4000BC, as well as having seen Neolithic, Viking and Medieval settlements. Today, the island is deserted, with wild goats roaming the land. The island is also a favourite of kayakers in the Dublin region.
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Kilmainham Gaol

Kilmainham Gaol

Kilmainham Gaol opened its doors in 1796 as the new County Gaol for Dublin. Today the building symbolises the tradition of militant and constitutional nationalism from the rebellion of 1798 to the Irish Civil War of 1922-23. The great collection consists of a wide variety of object types, including manuscripts, photographs, newspapers, weaponry, artwork, medals, uniforms and personal effects especially related to the political imprisonment in the 1916-23 period, as well as the experience of women during the Civil War.
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