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Section in Irish Islands
North West (Donegal)
Abandon the mortal world and embrace the magical, creative spirit of the North West Islands. These timeless Irish-speaking (Gaeltacht) islands are a window on to the past, to the Ireland of yore which has all but disappeared. The distinctive rocky Atlantic landscape reigns: sea birds perched on rugged cliffs, dramatic sea caves, spectacular ocean views and an overwhelming natural beauty which inspired so much folklore, lyric and song. The country's most remote inhabited island, Tory Island is found here, interestingly, this island is presided over by its own elected king!
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Tory Island - Toraigh

Tory Island - Toraigh

Until the 16th century, Colmcille's monastery defined the island. In Toraigh, the most remote of all the inhabited Irish isles, tradition and high spirits abound. A Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking region), this island is fiercely proud of its folklore, music and dance. A haven for artists, the beauty of this small island has inspired the imagination for generations. Other landmarks of note include the Lighthouse, the Wishing Stone, and Balor's Fort. An interesting fact is that this island traditionally elects its own king - the only place in Ireland to do so.
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Gola Island - Gabhla

Gola Island - Gabhla

Gabhla is one of the lesser-known islands. Long uninhabited, interest was revived recently, particularly among rock climbers and birdwatchers. An off the beaten track walk brings visitors to a lake with abundant bird life; cormorants, razorbills, guillemots as well as gannets and kittiwakes. Somewhere this peaceful, you may feel as though you've been transported to another world - but the island is in fact only 2km from Gweedore, with ferries departing from Magheragallan (Machaire Gathlan). Note: during low season, booking is required.
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Arranmore - Árainn Mhór

Arranmore - Árainn Mhór

Arranmore is the biggest inhabited island in County Donegal. A Gaeltacht region, many mainlanders cherish memories of visiting this island to participate in Irish-language summer schools as teenagers. Outdoor and aquatic activities are popular here, such as birdwatching, rock climbing, diving, sailing, kayaking, but most of all angling, as the sea and freshwater lakes here are rich in fish. This is the perfect place to get acquainted with the Islander spirit.
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