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A Coruña

A Coruña

A Coruña is a busy and attractive city at the very tip of Galicia. This is a perfect place to enjoy a gentle stroll along the streets and avenues, where it is possible to discover Roman architecture as well as modern innovative buildings. The atmosphere in the many magnificent town squares is excellent and full of joy of life on a hot summer’s day. Outside the town centre the beaches, the marina, the fishing port and the commercial port still play a very important role for the people of A Coruña.
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Barcelona

Barcelona

Fanciful architecture and hip restaurants have come together with the sunny Spanish climate and beaches. This has transformed Barcelona in just a few decades from a rough port city to one of Europe’s—if not the world’s—premier destinations. Stroll along La Rambla, admire the Casa Calvet’s façade or the Casa Mila designed by Gaudi, visit the Market of la Boqueria or shop at El Corte Inglés, and sample some of the many bars, cafés and late night haunts while you’re at it.
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Bilbao

Bilbao

The Basque city of Bilbao is a spellbinding capital of design and gastronomy. With one of the world’s finest buildings - the Guggenheim - at its heart, Bilbao dazzles with style and energy and boasts a unique identity and still speaks Europe’s oldest and most enigmatic language.
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Granada

Granada

The impressive, enchanting shadow of the Alhambra casts a magical spell upon all who pass through Granada. This is a city of legends created by gypsies and pirates, played out in the warren of the Albayzin, and in the inescapable presence of the ancient Moorish castle, the famous Alhambra. The Sierra Nevada Mountains provide an impressive backdrop and add to the enchanting feel of this miraculous place.
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Jerez

Jerez

Surrounded by vineyards and with over 30 bodegas (wine cellars) devoted to the art of making sherry and brandy, you’d be forgiven for thinking that’s all Jerez is about. This aristocratic city with an ancient heart, unusual museums, an atmospheric gypsy quarter and some outstanding architecture, is also the cradle of flamenco, the home of the magnificent ‘dancing’ Andalucian horses and the capital of motorcycle racing.
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Madrid

Madrid

It is possible that the city that never sleeps has calmed down a little in recent years, but even if the bars close a bit earlier these days, you can still count on finding a party atmosphere at all times of the day and in all situations. And then, once you have had enough of socializing, you can take a few days out and enjoy the best kilometre of art to be found in Europe.
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Santander

Santander

Santander is famous for its fabulous beaches and its elegant holidaymakers: King Alfonso XIII used to spend his summers here nearly a hundred years ago, and the town is still popular among fashionable madrileños who like to be seen sauntering along the El Sardinero seafront with its belle époque architecture. When the sun goes down and the bikinis are cast off, the town also has some great restaurants and a lively bar scene. It is also a good place from which to explore the pristine countryside of Cantabria.
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Santiago de Compostela

Santiago de Compostela

Santiago de Compostela has been a centre for culture and scholarship for centuries, most famous for being the end destination of a thousand-year-old pilgrimage: El Camino de Santiago, or the Way of Saint James. Being the capital of the Galician region in north-western Spain, everyday life in Santiago is modern and chic. Awarded recognition as a UNESCO World Heritage City in 1985, Santiago de Compostela is a historical gem and one of the most impressive cities in Spain.
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Seville

Seville

The charismatic city of Seville has a certain swagger that sets it apart from quainter Andalusian towns. It is a city with undeniable personality and a confidence that could only come from a place bathed in sunlight almost year-round. It boasts a fascinating history of Roman and Moorish invasions, followed by unparalleled Colonial prosperity, this mix of influences giving rise to Seville's cultural cornucopia of architecture, cuisine and the region's fiery dance, Flamenco. Tangled alley labyrinths, exquisite cathedrals and animated tapas bars line the Guadalquivir river which winds its way through the Andalusian capital as it wears its heart on its sleeve for visitors and sevillanos alike.
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Valencia

Valencia

Valencia is one of the most vibrant cities in Europe. With a privileged location by the Mediterranean sea, it offers a perfect combination of beaches and culture, where historic monuments can be found alongside futuristic attractions. The birthplace of paella, it boasts a thriving food scene featuring Michelin starred restaurants as well as quirky tapas bars. Its neighbourhoods come to life during traditional festivals like Las Fallas whilst at night there is a buzzing atmosphere in the many bars and clubs in trendy districts like Ruzafa or El Carmen.
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Zaragoza

Zaragoza

Zaragoza, the capital of Aragon, has a privileged location with an equal distance from Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia and Bilbao. The city counts on an international airport and the high-Speed line (AVE). The destination has a delicious gastronomy and a rich heritage of historical monuments (Basilica del Pilar, Cathedral of San Salvador, Aljafería Palace, the paintings of Goya or the Mudejar–UNESCO Heritage of Mankind). The city also has renewed infraestructures from the 2008 International Expo (Water Tower, Bridge Pavilion or river Aquarium).
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