The White Tower

The White Tower

The White Tower is the most iconic symbol of the city. The tower was constructed by the Ottomans sometime in the early 15th century and once guarded the eastern end of the city's sea walls. In the 19th century, this tower was used as a notorious prison. Nowadays, it is a welcoming museum of art and local history. The museum offers a rapid lesson in the history of the city. Ideally, you'll take in this well-dosed overview before continuing to the more specialized museums and archeological sites. For best results, grab the free audio guide at the entrance. The last floor of the tower gives you a wonderful view of the city.
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Explore the Halkidiki Region

Explore the Halkidiki Region

The region of Halkidiki lies southeast from Thessaloniki. It is known for its jutting peninsulas, Mediterranean forests and sandy beaches in warm, sheltered bays. The region is often described as having three 'legs' — Kassandra, Sithonia and Athos peninsulas. Kassandra, the westernmost peninsula, is the most developed, offering modern resorts and nightclubs. Sithonia, also known as Longos, offers over a 100 beaches, cute villages and is a popular destination for families. Athos is an important centre of Eastern Orthodox church. It's main point of interest, Mount Athos, is home to 20 monasteries.
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Heptapyrgion of Thessalonica

Heptapyrgion of Thessalonica

While exploring the historic Ano Poli — the Old City or Upper Town — you will stumble upon the old city wall and the Heptapyrgion. It is a Byzantine and Ottoman-era fortress. You can pay to see the renovated. interior part, which used to serve as a prison in 1890–1990. It's not a must thought: enjoy your urban hike up to the monument, check out the panoramic views and sip a frappe in one of the charming cafes in the area. Edy Kulѐ or Eptapirgio (Seven Towers) is a medieval fortress with towers in the northeastern part of Thessaloniki. Despite its name, the fortress has ten towers. The fortress was built in the IX century, and some parts of it were built later. Like the White Tower, it was used as a prison from the late 19th century to 1978. Lots of history and beauty in one place, worth a look!
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Waterfront and Boat Rides

Waterfront and Boat Rides

Thessaloniki's waterfront is a long boardwalk that stretches about 4.5 km, all the way from the First Pier to the Thessaloniki Concert Hall. Enjoy a stroll, a jog or a a bike ride, ideally in the morning or closer to sunset. You'll make your way past the Ladadika district, the White Tower and Alexander the Great statue, parks, gardens and sports facilities. Ornate boat tours departing from around the White Tower give you an opportunity to see the city from a new angle.
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Mount Olympus
Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki
Ladadika Quarter

Ladadika Quarter

The narrow pavements and neoclassical buildings of Ladadika host plenty of bars, restaurants, cafes and cute boutiques. The area from Salaminos street to YMCA Park is known as Ladadika Quarter. This is an old quarter that starts at the waterfront and goes a few blocks inland up to Tsimiski Avenue that is busy with international and local brand shops. The north-western part of the area, closer to the First Pier, is a bit more subdued, with less mainstream bars and fewer shops available. As you go south-west, the area becomes more and more lively, and finally brings you to the iconic White Tower.
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Markets — The Old and The New

Markets — The Old and The New

Exploring local markets is an excellent way to discover the city's culture. Foodies will appreciate seasonal fruits and veggies, regional cheeses and street food. Additionally, you can find anything from modern necessities of life to artisanal handmade cosmetics. Here are some of the main markets you should check out: Kapani Market — the oldest open public market in Thessaloniki. Focused on Greek delicacies, traditional cafes, tavernas and bakeries. Smack in the city centre, it sprawls over several pedestrian streets and some parts are covered. Athonos Square — a spot for small traditional shops that offer spices and food products, handmade patio furniture and wicker crafts. Some jewelry, clothing and craft designer shops have sprung up in the last few years. Modiano Market — was build in the 1920s and resembles some Parisian markets. Here. you'll find traditional food items and a good selection on modern and old-fashioned tavernas. Bezesteni Market — a former Turkish bath with from the 15th century now houses housing clothing, florist and jewelry shops. You can take the stairs to the attic and have a closer look at the six domes. Worth a visit for the architectural value alone. Martiou Market — takes place every Saturday at Martiou, a neighborhood at the eastern part of the city. Fishermen bring fresh catch from the Northern Aegean and from around the Halkidiki region. Fish of all sizes, mussels and octopuses won't stay on the counters long! Come early.
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Aristotelous Square

Aristotelous Square

Aristotelous Square is the most impressive square in Thessaloniki. It features buildings with monumental architecture inspired by European and colonial models, cafes, shops and restaurants. It is the focal point in big celebrations, such as the coming of the New Year, and is the de facto meeting place during the day. The history of Aristotelous Square began with the Great Fire of 1917 that destroyed two thirds of the city. French architect Ernest Hébrard designed Aristotelous Square to serve as an end of a monumental axis for Thessaloniki that would stretched from the seafront to Dikastirion Square and the Roman Forum. The final design, finally build in the 1950s, is a lot more stripped down than Hébrard's original proposal, but still has significant architectural value.
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The Rotunda of Galerius

The Rotunda of Galerius

Unique in Greece, the Rotunda is a cylindrical building from the early 4th century AD. The mosaics inside are really impressive. The Rotunda is a massive circular structure (built in 306 AD) with a masonry core. Through its long history, it has gone through multiple periods of use and modification as a polytheist temple: a Christian basilica, a Muslim mosque, and a Christian church once again. A minaret is preserved from its use as a mosque, and ancient remains are exposed on its southern side. Some Greek publications claim it is the oldest Christian church in the world! These days, the Rotunda is primarily an archaeological site, where visitors can see some remaining Christian mosaics and feel the weight of history.
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The Arch of Galerius (Kamara)

The Arch of Galerius (Kamara)

In addition to The Rotonda, this is one of the two most characteristic monuments in town. The Galerius arch is situated close. to the eastern city wall, a short distance from the Kassandreotiki gate. The 4th-century AD Roman emperor Galerius commissioned both structures to show off his power. A road used to run through the arch, past. the Rotunda and on to the palace to the southwest. The arch is composed of a masonry core faced with marble sculptural panels celebrating a victory over the seventh emperor in the Sassanid Persian Empire. About two-thirds of the arch is preserved. Colloquially, the monument in known as Kamara (Καμάρα) — that's Greek for 'arch'
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