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City of David and Hezekiah's Tunnel

City of David and Hezekiah's Tunnel

Here you can explore the remains of the oldest part of Jerusalem, and walk into water through the meanders of a subterranean stream. The archaeological site of the City of David spreads over two levels: an above-the-ground area and underground excavations. It is much older than Jerusalem's Old City: the ancient population of Canaanites built it near the waters of the Gihon Spring before 2,000 BCE. The biblical king David conquered it and made it the capital of his domain. Located in the underground part of the site, Hezekiah's tunnel was used to channel water from the spring. The half-an-hour walk inside will show many archaeological remains, including a millennial pool which was said to have healing powers. If you wish to walk into water, bring your swimsuit and suitable shoes.
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Museum on the Seam

Museum on the Seam

The past of Jerusalem is hugely fascinating, but the present is at least equally as important. Located on the very border between West and East Jeursalem, the Museum on the Seam provides great food for thought on contemporary social issues in the land. It has hosted exhibitions from some of the most important artists of our time (Bill Viola, Wim Wenders, and Anselm Kiefer to name a few). Since the exhibitions are often strongly connected to ongoing debates, they can be controversial; however, it is worth paying a visit to the museum, marked as a must-see destination by the New York Times.
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Church of St. Peter of Gallicantu

Church of St. Peter of Gallicantu

This Byzantine-style catholic church on Mount Zion offers great views over the City of David and the village of Silwan, inhabited by Palestinians. The current building was finished in the 1930s on the site of previous churches, including a byzantine monastery, and has some interesting decorations (check the stained glass windows). Inside, you will be able to view mosaics and remains from previous churches. According to the tradition, the church is the place where the apostle Peter cried in regret having denied Jesus before his death. The roman stairs next to the church are believed to have been used by Jesus on his way to Gethsemane.
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St Anne's Church

St Anne's Church

St Anne's Church was built by crusaders in the 12th century in a Romanesque style. Many pilgrims take advantage of the perfect acoustics inside and sing religious hymns. Hidden in the courtyard you'll find some remains of a Roman pagan temple. The church was a Muslim school for some time under the Saladin, and is considered to be the site of many important events in the Christian religion: the home of Virgin Mary's parents, Joachim and Anne, and of the Pool of Betheseda, where Jesus healed a sick man.
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