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Do & See

Castello Grande / Castello Svevo

The Holy Roman Emperor, Frederick II, founded this imposing complex of fortifications which served as the imperial residence, prison, arsenal and garrison. A succession of kings and emperors added more towers and ramparts. Charles I of Anjou reinforced the walls at the end of the 13th century, Ferdinand I King of Naples strengthened them two centuries later and 18th century rulers added still more. During the 19th century the castle served as a prison, and since the 19th century it has been an Italian Navy base, and is strictly closed to the public aside from organised tours.
Monumento al Marinaio d’Italia

Monumento al Marinaio d’Italia

Monumento Al Marinaio d’Italia - Monument to the Italian Sailor Built in 1933 at the peak of Mussolini’s Fascist regime, this grandiloquent memorial towering over Brindisi’s inner harbour survives as a monument to Italian seamen lost during two world wars. Designed by the architect Luigi Brunati and sculptor Amerigo Bartoli, the monument mimics a giant rudder 53 m (174 ft) high, beneath which a crypt in the shape of a ship’s hull bears the names of the 36,000 Italians lost at sea during World War I and WWII.
Do & See

Museo Archeologico Provinciale

Francesco Ribrezzo Provincial Archaeological Museum The rooms of this interesting archaeological museum are arranged around different themes and contain a wealth of Greek and Roman statues, mosaics, bronze and silver coins, pottery and weapons. The top attraction, however, is the the Punta del Serrone collection of bronzes, salvaged from the seabed not far from Brindisi harbour in the early 1990's.
Francavilla Fontana

Francavilla Fontana

Around 40 km (25 miles) southwest of Brindisi, Francavilla Fontana is known for the numerous palatial mansions built by local aristocrats during the Baroque period. The most striking of these, the Palazzo Imperiali, on Via Municipale, now houses municipal offices. The town also boasts a treasury of Baroque churches, notably the Chiesa Matrice, dating from 1759, which houses and allegedly miracle-working icon of the Madonna della Fontana, patron saint of the town.
Do & See

Ostuni

Ostuni, about 32 km (20 miles) west of Brindisi, where a labyrinth of whitewashed lanes and alleys surrounds a hilltop crowned by a medieval cathedral, is the most impressive of Puglia’s ’white towns’, with sweeping views across the surrounding farmlands to the east coast.
Lecce

Lecce

About 40 km (25 miles) southeast of Brindisi, Lecce is the jewel of the Puglia region. A historic town with a treasury of Baroque churches and mansions, a dramatic Roman theatre on its main square, and a sturdy medieval castle that is in the process of being turned into a centre for the arts. It has some excellent hotels and plenty of bars and restaurants.
Do & See

Gallipoli

The best sandy beaches in the region can be found just south of this pretty fishing port on Puglia’s west coast, about 80 km (50 miles) south of Brindisi, where yet another medieval castle guards a fine natural harbour overlooked by old whitewashed houses. Gallipoli has plenty of places to stay to suit all budgets and some excellent fish restaurants.
Do & See

Duomo

Work began on Brindisi’s impressive Cathedral in the 11th century and it was rebuilt in the mid-18th century. Parts of the original building, including a 12th century mosaic floor, can still be seen.
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