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Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge

Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge

The Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge is found at the far reaches of southeastern Lake Havasu. Rumored to contain the largest surviving cottonwood-willow woodlands of the lower Colorado River, the Refuge covers 6,000 acres. Perhaps most importantly, the Bill Williams River serves as a comfortable refuge to over 300 species of birds and waterfowl. There is a number of endangered species currently in propagation, including the razorback sucker fish and bony-tail chubs—which are indigenous to the Bill Williams River. Additionally, the Audubon Society named the Refuge an area of global significance in 2011.
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Havasu Landing Casino Lakeside Resort

Havasu Landing Casino Lakeside Resort

Lakeside views without the smog of a city: the Havasu Landing Casino has Vegas-level excitement with the freshness of clear Havasu waters. There are electronic slots on the main casino floor, as well as a card room for blackjack and three-card poker. Accessing the casino is done by way of the Tecopa ferry. The ferry departs from the London Bridge and lasts approximately 17 minutes. It’s also acceptable to access Havasu Landing via personal watercraft.
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The Weekend Warrior Bass Series

The Weekend Warrior Bass Series

Designed for the beginner or average fisherman who doesn’t have the time to dedicate to a professional circuit, the Weekend Warrior Bass Series is the perfect pick-up fishing experience. As the Series is not professional, anglers who are visiting Lake Havasu City will enjoy a weekend or two of fishing. An Angler of the Year hold out from each entry is held throughout the season. The event takes place near the London Bridge Channel, and a complete list of rules, eligibility requirements, schedules, and entry information is located on the JML Outdoors website.
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Lake Havasu Museum of History

Lake Havasu Museum of History

Come learn about Lake Havasu City’s extensive past at the Museum of History. The culture and history of the area are showcased in permanent exhibits, including the history of the Native American Chemehuevi and Mojave tribes; the role of the lower Colorado River and the steamboat era; the relocation of the London Bridge from the banks of England to Arizona; and an overview of the native wildlife (from Desert Bighorn Sheep and coyote to several reptile species).
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