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Section in Mallorca
Do & See
There is so much more to do in Mallorca than party and soak up the sun – but be sure to indulge in some of that too. Explore historical and impressive Palma, visit tiny coastal villages and remote mountain monasteries, hike the Serra de Tramuntana, take a dip in any of the picturesque coves surrounding the island, or go wine tasting in the Binissalem Wine Village. Mallorca offers a truly notable variety of sights and activities, and those who take the time to explore this small and very manageable island in depth will be greatly rewarded.
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Coves del Drac

Coves del Drac

Coves del Drac (Cuevas del Drach/Dragon Caves) is a unique network of caves situated in an old fishing village called Porto Cristo, around 65 kilometres from Palma. Go underground and visit this impressive complex boasting thousands upon thousands of stalagmites, stalactites as well as a stunning underground lake. Guided tours take around one hour and include a boat trip across Lake Martel. At the end of the tour, a classical music concert completes the magical setting.
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Castell d'Alaró

Castell d'Alaró

Perched on the rocky edge of Mallora, Castell d'Alaro is one of the island's most rewarding climbs — recommended by lovers of both history and nature. These ruins, a crumbling castle, several arched stone doors, and wall remnants are all that remains of what was once the fortress of 9th-century Christian warriors. Less adventurous visitors may drive to the ascent to take in the stunning views over almost the entire island. In case you want to stay overnight, Castell d'Alaró also functions as a guesthouse. There's also a small bar and restaurant where you can recharge your batteries and enjoy a meal with fantastic views.
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La Seu Cathedral

La Seu Cathedral

This imposing 14th-century Gothic cathedral stands tall atop the old Roman and Renaissance city walls, looking out over Palma's harbour and old town. It was built over hundreds of years on the ruins of the mosque that once stood there. Famous Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí had a hand in the restoration project early in the 20th century, though he quit the project over a dispute with the contractor. This beautiful architectural wonder offers breathtaking views in every direction and is the perfect starting point for a walking tour through the city.
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El Casco Antiguo – Old Town

El Casco Antiguo – Old Town

The quiet, narrow, and winding cobbled streets of the Old Town echo with centuries of sea-faring, intercontinental trade, and intercultural encounters. Wander around these medieval streets and discover high traditional Mallorcan buildings, spectacular squares, beautiful courtyards, and so many more historical treasures. This is also where you will find most of the must-see tourist attractions, such as the magnificent La Seu Cathedral, the Royal Palace of Almudaina, and the Es Baluard Museum of Modern and Contemporary.
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The Carthusian Monastery of Valldemossa

The Carthusian Monastery of Valldemossa

High mountains and deep valleys frame Valldemossa, the village where the island's first two "celebrity tourists" — composer Frederic Chopin and authoress George Sand — lived in 1838. Once here, make sure to visit the village's main attraction: The Carthusian Monastery of Valldemossa. Originally built as a royal palace in 1309 and later converted into a monastery of the Carthusian order, the Carthusian Monastery of Valldemossa is an impressive complex that houses a palace, a church, an old pharmacy, an art collection of some of the greatest modern Spanish and local artists, and the cells where the monks lived for 400 years to find peace and rest. Each cell has its own exit to the garden terrace with blossoming magnolias and a wonderful view over the valley.
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Soller

Soller

The inhabitants of this idyllic village lived for centuries hidden in a valley behind a huge row of mountains. It was so hard to climb the mountain chain that people preferred to go to Palma by boat. And if they were on a boat anyway, why not go to France? Soller became tri-lingual — Mallorcan, Spanish, and French. In 1911, a tunnel was dug through the mountains so that the people of Soller could finally have better access to their own island. The town's charming little train still runs today. The ride from Palma to Sóller lasts about an hour, and it offers beautiful mountain views.
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