Provided by: Szymon Maksymiuk
BE HAPPY Sweet Art & Illusion Museum

BE HAPPY Sweet Art & Illusion Museum

Museum of happiness in Szczecin. Be Happy Museum is a place where dreams come true and the imagination turns into a sweet and colorful experience. This is a place where illusion stuns and laughs to tears. Dozens of scenes for taking photos, Marshmallow foam pool, banana swing, magic unicorn and much more. Our mission is to cultivate happiness, share good memories and make the world even sweeter! Visit us and share your best photos with the world! Totally Instagram-Friendly Attraction!
Read more
TRAFO Center for Contemporary Art

TRAFO Center for Contemporary Art

TRAFO Center for Contemporary Art was opened in 2013. It is located in Szczecin – the Polish capital of the German-Polish border region Pomerania. TRAFO serves as a multifunctional meeting platform for artists and visitors. It introduces the audience to the tools of art by putting them in various contexts and transdisciplinary relationships. Visual works interact with literature, music, theatre, social sciences and new technologies. TRAFO acts as an “interpreter” promoting art and placing it in an extremely complex cultural, socio-political, economic and existential domain. TRAFO is a post-institution which does not follow rigid rules in the rapidly changing world of art. TRAFO is a testing ground for the history of art, it provides a space for experimentation and demonstration of the artistic process, production and testing of knowledge. The program of TRAFO consists of exhibitions, research and residency programs, publishing activities, meetings, concerts, lectures. Its integral part is an ongoing educational program addressed to different age groups and introducing them to the issues of contemporary art. TRAFO Center for Contemporary Art in Szczecin is a public art institution organized by the City of Szczecin.
Read more
The National Museum in Szczecin — The Szczecin History Museum -Old Town Hall

The National Museum in Szczecin — The Szczecin History Museum -Old Town Hall

The first mention of the wooden market hall, which was also the venue for the deliberations of the court and the meetings of the city councillors called “theatrum”, dates back to 1245. The current Gothic town hall hails from mid-15th Century, with Henryk Brunsberg considered to be its builder. The richly-decorated façade featuring glazed stones adds a painterly style to the structure. The building has arcades on its south wall, which used to play host to court proceedings on summer days. The City Council convened here twice a week. From the 14th Century the resolutions of the City Council were announced twice a year, i.e. on 1 May and 29 September. As some of them were quite peculiar, it is no wonder that such announcements sometimes left the city in tumult. Examples included the introduction of the anti-Hussite tax in 1428 and the raising of the prices of spirits in 1616. Less severe regulations were e.g. the resolution from 1418 against calumniators and rumourmongers slandering “lords, dukes, knights, squires, ladies, girls, priests, and vassals...”, or one law from 1558 which limited the luxury and excess during wedding celebrations, baptisms, and funerals. From 5 to 13 December 1570 the town hall hosted a Peace Congress ending the Northern Seven Years' War between Sweden and Denmark. After the damage suffered during the Brandenburg sieges, it was rebuilt in the Baroque style and served its purpose until the City Council was moved to the New Town Hall in 1879. Reconstructed again after the War in 1975 as the National Museum, it houses exhibitions dedicated to Szczecin’s past.
Read more
The National Museum in Szczecin — The Museum of Contemporary Art

The National Museum in Szczecin — The Museum of Contemporary Art

The Museum of Contemporary Art is located in a classicist building of former Szczecin stronghold garrison headquarters, built in the last quarter of the 18th century, repeatedly converted in subsequent years. As long, as until the end of World War II, it was used by military authorities. In 1970s it was handed over to the National Museum in Szczecin. In 1980, after a conversion, it became the seat of a branch of the Museum related to contemporary art. Series of temporary exhibitions carries out a programme of propagating and promoting contemporary art on the basis of the Museum's own collection (Polish and foreign art) and projects co-arranged with other institutions, organizations and artists in Poland and abroad. Beside presentations of vital phenomena of Polish art, regional programme focused on the most important artists of Western Pomerania, the Museum coordinates international Mare Articum programme, within which, among others, it organizes Baltic Contemporary Art Biennial.
Read more
The National Museum in Szczecin — The Museum of Regional Traditions

The National Museum in Szczecin — The Museum of Regional Traditions

The Museum of Regional Traditions is located in Baroque Landed Gentry House (Pommersche Landsmannschaft), built in years 1726–1727 according to the order of Prussian king Frederick William I. The building was designed by Gerhard Cornelius de Walrave (1692–1773), the author of, among others, famous Kłodzko fortess and fortifications of Szczecin. The palace served as the session hall of Pomeranian provincial authorities and a royal residence during king's stays in Szczecin. Over the entrance, there is the coat of arms of Pomerania and at the top of the facade – coat of arms of the king of Prussia against a background of panoply (crossed military equipment) and allegoric images of royal virtues: Justice and Sagacity. In the period between the world wars the palace was re-arranged into the seat of the Pomeranian State Museum (Pommersches Landesmuseum), and after World War II the building was taken over by the Museum of Western Pomerania, presently the National Museum in Szczecin. It houses exhibitions of, above all, relics of Pomeranian art from middle ages to Baroque, including Romanesque capitals from Kołbacz, early-Gothic Crucifix from Kamień Pomorski, a portrait of duke Philip I by Lucas Cranach the Younger and impressive jewels of Pomeranian dukes from the 16th and 17th centuries.
Read more
Dialogue Center "Upheavals"

Dialogue Center "Upheavals"

It's one of branches of the National Museum in Szczecin, where we present the newest history of Szczecin and West Pomerania region, with particular attention given to social protests and breaking events in the years 1970–1971, 1980–1981, 1988–1989, that lead Poland to regain independence in 1989. The building that houses our museum is partially hidden under the Solidarity Plaza, adjacent to the Concert Hall. The exhibition is interactive, apart from subject-related pieces, in its underground rooms you may see films, pictures and recordings of the events’ witnesses and participants. Location of the museum has not been chosen by an accident - it was here when on 17 December 1970 first shots were fired at the protesters. In July 2016, the Dialogue Centre Upheavals was ranked the Best Public Space in Europe. Four months later, on November 18, the same building was named World Building of the Year.
Read more
Museum of Technology and Transport

Museum of Technology and Transport

“Art Depot” in Szczecin is an old tram depot which was built in 1912 with reinforced concrete. It has a sloping roof and a front glass wall with a clock. Since 2006 it has been one of the biggest Polish museums of a technological profile. The collection of almost 100 antique vehicles that was bought from Leszek Liszewski is the most precious. There, you can find such curiosities as micro-car Smyk or the one and only SUV version of Fiat 126p called in Polish “maluch” (tiny). Moreover, there are trams, buses (that you can enter), motorcycles, bikes,non-typical vehicles, electronic, telecommunication and household equipment and many more.
Read more
Pomeranian Dukes' Castle

Pomeranian Dukes' Castle

Anyone entering Szczecin by bridges over the Oder River can see the towering red-brick gothic Cathedral and an elegant, pale silhouette of a Renaissance castle with green towers, which used to be the seat of the dukes of the Griffins dynasty who ruled the Duchy of Pomerania. The Pomeranian Dukes’ Castle has five wings and two courtyards. Acting as a cultural institution it organizes an array of cultural events: concerts, theatre performances, exhibitions, conferences and meetings to popularize science, as well as to spread knowledge about the history of West Pomerania. The largest wing houses an Opera. In the wing that housed a mint in the olden days one can find today Cultural and Tourist Information Centre. There is a panoramic terrace on the rooftop of the northern wing from where splendid views can be appreciated. The wing’s basement houses a Vault with sarcophaguses of six princes. The Duke Boguslaw X hall, which used to be a princely chapel, is now a concert hall with a polychromatic ceiling decorated in Renaissance style. A 17th century astronomical clock is the Castle’s special tourist attraction. Also a room dedicated to Eilhard Lubinus and the Witches’ Cell are definitely worth a visit.
Read more
Chrobry Embankment (Haken's Terrace)

Chrobry Embankment (Haken's Terrace)

The Chrobry Embankment, formerly Haken’s Terraces, one of the most beautiful places in Europe. From here you can watch the vast panorama of the Odra River and the harbour. The viewing terraces are 500 m long and are located 19 m above the Odra river bank. The earliest written history of the area dates back to the sixteenth century. In 1873, a demolition of the eighteenth-century fortifications of Szczecin began. Thanks to the great commitment of Hermann Haken, High Mayor of Szczecin, in the years 1902-1905 a viewing terrace was formed on the site of Fort Leopold. Wide staircases run on both sides from the terrace to the banks of the river, where two pavilions were erected as the entrance to the restaurant, created contemporarily in the remains of the fortifications. At the bottom, there is a fountain decorated with figures of John of Kolno and Wyszak and two tall columns stylized as lighthouses. In the years 1906 to 1912 in the northern part of the terrace an architectural complex was built for the then regency of Szczecin, where now the authorities of the West-Pomeranian province have their headquarters. In addition, in the southern part of the Embankment a building complex of the Maritime Academy is located (from the years 1902-1905 and 1918-1921) and, housed in the same building, Contemporary Theatre and the Maritime Branch of the National Museum. Moreover, a large park is situated near the Chrobry Embankment.
Read more
St. James Arch Cathedral and the tower

St. James Arch Cathedral and the tower

After the 1147 crusade against the Polabian Slavs, Szczecin became a place of German colonisation. St Jacob’s Church, intended for German colonists, was consecrated in 1187. It was founded by Beringer, a Bramberg pilgrim, and given to the custody of the Benedictine brothers from the St Michael Monastery in Bramberg. The construction of the brick church continued for dozens of years, starting in the middle of the 13th Century from a three-aisle basilica with two spires and a basilica-like presbytery, surrounded with a by-pass and a circle of chapels. The altars were founded by the Szczecin guilds and companies. The presbytery reconstruction started in 1370. The basilica frame was changed into the hall frame with a circle of chapels between the interior buttresses. At the outset of the 15th Century Henry Brunsberg built additional chapels on the southern aisle, decorating them with impressive ornaments made of tiled moulders. In 1456 the southern spire collapsed during a hurricane, destroying the basilica corpus. During reconstruction, additional chapels were erected in the northern section, together with only one spire in the western part, as a result of which the corpus was changed from the basilica frame into a hall church frame. The reconstruction work was completed in 1503. In the last 25 years of the 17th Century, the interior section was reconstructed in the Baroque style. The St Jacob bell, constructed by Wawrzyniec Köckeritz, the Szczecin bell-founder, was placed in the church tower. The altar was created by sculptor Erhard Löffler, and the painting, entitled “Taken down the cross”, was made by Lengereich. The organ front was sculptured by the Amsterdam master Van der Linden. While assembling the organs with a large scale of sounds, advice was provided by master Buxtehude from Lübeck. The capacity of this instrument was wonderfully utilised by organist and composer Karl Loewe, residing in Szczecin in 1820-1866. The church was badly damaged during the 16 August 1944 shelling. Its reconstruction did not start until 1972 and has continued until today. The official consecration of the cathedral was performed on 31 May 1982 by Kazimierz Majdański, the Szczecin-Kamieniec Bishop. The status of Cathedral Basilica was given by Pope John Paul II on 23 May 1983, and the status of Metropolitan Basilica on 25 March 1992. Considering the ongoing additions to the rich furnishings of the church, we suggest that you buy a current version of the guidebook while visiting this astonishing place. The tower is an element of the St. James Metropolitan Basilica Cathedral. An observation deck is available for tourist all year long. The entrance to the terrace is only via a lift.
Read more
Visiting the cathedral tower

Visiting the cathedral tower

The tower is an element of the St. James Metropolitan Basilica Cathedral. An observation deck is available for tourist all year long. The entrance to the terrace is only via a lift. Opening hours: Monday-Thursday 10.00-19.00 Friday-Sunday 10.00-20.00 Visiting the cathedral tower outside the opening hours (minimum 10 people) is possible by prior arrangement by phone or email with the head of the facility: Dorian Sierek tel. 501 858 223, email: kierownik@katedra.szczecin.pl Ticket prices: normal 10 PLN / 2.5 Euro concession 6 PLN / 1.5 Euro (children and young people studying up to 25 years of age on presentation of a valid school or student ID card) group 8 PLN / 2 Euro (for groups of over 20 people) Children under 7 - free admission. Minors should be under the care of an adult. Exemption from fees is available to carers of organized groups.
Read more
View on map