Provided by: Sergei Zjuganov
Section in Tallinn
See & Do
Tallinn is a highly compact city, most of which can easily be explored on foot without the need for taxis or buses. Most of the best opportunities for sightseeing, cultural events, dining, shopping, and nightlife are conveniently massed in city centre. Whatever your agenda, whichever of the Tallinn´s you need – the romantic, Medieval Tallinn or the trendy, high-tech one – the doors are open. Just take your pick and head on in! The Tallinn Card gives you free entry to 40 museums and other interesting attractions, one free sightseeing tour of your choice, free use of public transport and a variety of entertainment options. Find even more tips at

My Tallinn - Old Town

High quality short video introducing Tallinn as a tourist destination for families. Sights from the medieval Tallinn City Wall to Town Hall Square and hidden gems in the oldest part of the city.

My Tallinn - Kalamaja

High quality short video introducing Tallinn as a tourist destination for families. Discovering the lovely bohemian seaside area on Balloon Tallinn, the icebreaker Suur Tõll and schooner Kajsamoor, exploring histroy and science in Seaplane Harbour Museum.

Town Hall Square

From this spot, with a little stretching and bending, you can see the tops of all five of Old Town's spires. Today, the square remains the social heart of the city, a venue for open-air concerts, handicraft fairs and medieval markets. Each winter it's home to the town's Christmas tree – a tradition that stretches back to 1441 – and a buzzing Christmas Market. In spring it hosts the Old Town Days festival, a modern version of a medieval carnival, where traditions from the Middle Ages are kept alive.
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Danish King's Garden

This open, garden-like area on the slopes of Toompea Hill happens to be the legendary birthplace of the Danish flag. Nestled between the city wall and Lower Town, this relaxing spot is called the Danish King's Garden because it was supposedly here that King Valdemar II of Denmark and his troops camped before conquering Toompea in 1219. More importantly, a well-known legend both in Estonia and Denmark holds that the Danish flag, the Dannebrog, originated right here. According to the story, Valdemar's forces were losing their battle with the Estonians when suddenly the skies opened and a red flag with a white cross floated down from the heavens. Taking this as a holy sign, the Danes were spurred on to victory. Today the garden remains a place where locals honour the role Denmark played in Estonia's history. Halfway down the steps towards Rüütli street you can see an iron sword and shield with a Danish cross, and each summer, Danneborg Day is celebrated here.
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