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Jagalchi Fish Market

Jagalchi Fish Market

This legendary market will blow the mind of anyone who happens to have even a passing interest in seafood. The sheer variety of sea creatures sold here must be seen to be believed: apart from Korean favourites like crab and eel, there are the myriad types of fish and shellfish (try the 'kalguksu' noodles with clams, or 'bajirak'), plus essentially anything that can be extracted from the deep waters washing over Busan. One speciality that Jagalchi would be the best place to try is 'hoe' (pronounced /wɛ/), raw fish served cut in thin slithers almost like sashimi. Dip in sauce and wrap in a lettuce leaf for a flavour punch. Take a stroll around to gawk at the market's curiosities, such as the sea worm ('gaebul'), whose visual similarity to the male reproductive organ has earned it the apt nickname of 'penis fish'. Then, select the seafood that tickles your fancy and have it be cooked right then and there by one of the shops inside the market, many of which have a seating area in the second floor. Get all your seafood from a single vendor if you can, then proceed upstairs to be served your selection accompanied by sauces and side dishes (a few of the latter can be on the house if you're in luck). Mind that a cooking charge applies, and the price for side dishes is listed per person. Given the upsurge in tourist numbers, prices at Jagalchi have reportedly gone up in recent years, leaving it for travellers who aren't exactly on a budget. Do not despair: most of what you see at the market is most likely served at nearly any seafood restaurant in town.
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Boksoondoga F1963

Boksoondoga F1963

Located at the F1963 cultural centre is Boksoondoga, a fine dining restaurant celebrated for cultivating a revival of "makgeolli", a traditional variety of carbonated Korean rice wine that is fermented with "nuruk" and served unfiltered. Historically, this particular variety of wine was held to be a farmers' drink, but has now gained a following among the younger generations and brought into the realm of "hip" by enthusiasts such as the founding Kim brothers. The restaurant serves an excellent menu that straddles Korean and western influences. After a meal, explore on and browse through the book store and gallery space of F1963.
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Jang Su Sam

Jang Su Sam

This compact hole in the wall serves one thing and one thing only: Korean 'samgye-tang' (ginger chicken soup). Servings come with a whole young chicken stuffed with rice and flavourful ingredients like garlic and ginseng. The soup is attributed all sorts of curative properties, and is considered to be a traditional warm-weather dish. The owner is exceptionally friendly to foreign visitors, and willingly demonstrates the proper way to eat the soup. Each serving is accompanied by an assortment of Korean pickles and followed by a glass of a special ginseng drink and instant coffee.
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Samjin Amook Main Store

Samjin Amook Main Store

Fishcakes enjoy a long tradition in Busan, and Samjin Amook is Busan's oldest operating fishcake factory. Its main outlet is a fishcake bakery that features an observable production line, a store where multiple varieties of fishcake are on sale at surprisingly low prices, and even a museum in the top floor. There is a cafe of sorts across from the store, where your "catch" can be cooked into a full noodle dish. Fresh cakes sell out quick, so arrive early for best assortment. There are several smaller outlets across Busan, Including one in the central station.
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